Prenuptial agreements have a bad reputation. As you have begun marriage preparations, you may have heard advice from family or friends advising you against entering into a prenup. Some people feel so negatively about prenuptial agreements that they regard the mere mention of one as a sign that the marriage is doomed before it even begins.

However, a prenup is not a vote of no confidence in the relationship. Rather, it is a way for you and your future spouse to protect yourselves in the event of a divorce. Nobody enters into a marriage expecting to split up, but statistically, it is a distinct possibility. Knowing that you have prepared for the worst can help you strive for more.

Addressing common issues

A prenup is not intended to address every issue that may arise during a marriage, nor is it meant to settle marital disputes. Rather, its purpose is to address specific financial issues that commonly arise once a marriage is over, such as spousal maintenance, division of assets and allocation of debt.

However, when it comes to addressing common issues that arise during a divorce, a prenup has its limitations. For example, issues related to child support and allocation of parental responsibilities are beyond the scope of a prenuptial agreement.

Fostering healthy communications

The process of creating a prenuptial agreement involves frank and level-headed discussions between you and your future spouse regarding your current situation as well as your potential prospects. As a matter of necessity, you will learn how to communicate honestly and effectively with your future spouse regarding financial matters in the process.

Of the top three reasons most frequently cited for divorce, money and communication are two of the most common. Learning to communicate about money now with your spouse-to-be now may help both of you to resolve future disagreements or at least handle them more effectively. This can place your relationship on a firmer footing should issues arise later.

You have insurance on your house or car in case something goes wrong. A prenuptial agreement can act like insurance for your marriage. You have it in the hopes that you will never need it.